Animal

Delacroix’s Lion Devouring a Goat was owned first by Gustave Arosa and then his brother, Achille, successful business men and financiers in the latter half of the 19th century who each built up notable art collections. Gustave was the guardian of Paul Gauguin and perhaps the lover of his mother; he helped Gauguin financially, while introducing him to a wide social circle.

The National Gallery of Art in Washington has recently presented a splendid exhibition of paintings illustrating the American passion for Eighteenth Century French art, which shaped several major collections in the first decades of the Twentieth Century. Thanks to a renewed interest by collectors and museums in this same period in the 1970s and 1980s a number of major works, as well as paintings by less well-known artists who nonetheless held the post of First Painter of the King, were acquired from the Stair Sainty Gallery. A selection of these are illustrated here.   

The world's most prestigious art fair, TEFAF Maastricht, is taking place at the MECC, Maastricht, The Netherlands. The fair is open daily from 11 am and runs until the 19th March. Visit us on stand 348 and see a unique collection of paintings, from the 18th to early 20th centuries, including works by Greuze, Giaquinto, Vigée Le Brun, Rouart, Blanche, List, Marcel-Béronneau and Boutet de Monvel. For more information about TEFAF Maastricht, please contact the gallery.    ...

After a successful fair at La Biennale Paris, we are back at the gallery and our attention now turns to the busy Autumn Art Season here in London.  Come in and visit the gallery over the coming weeks as we exhibit Old Masters and 19th century paintings by Algardi, Goya, Greuze and Blanche to coincide with Frieze Masters art fair in Regent's Park, and early 20th century paintings by Marcel-Béronneau and Boutet de Monvel to compliment PAD London Art + Design, which is just around the corner in Berkeley Square.   For more information, please contact the gallery. ...

We salute the French people for their bravery during a time of great tragedy and loss, as well as the Société Nationale des Antiquaires for their decision to remain steadfast in celebrating France’s ongoing commitment to the arts. We hope that France will remain a beacon of light and enlightenment to inspire artists and visitors alike. ‘As an artist, a man has no home in Europe save in Paris’.  ‘ F. Nietzsche This year we dedicate our stand to the great city of Paris with artists who received their training in the city or had their first early success there. These include masters such as Jean-Baptiste Oudry, Jean-Baptiste Greuze and Élisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun, Baron Gérard and Élie Delaunay, as well as Jacques Émile Blanche, who documented Parisian intellectual life at the turn of the 20th century. The centre of our stand recalls the Belle Epoque fascination with Salomé, who inspired playwright Oscar Wilde and composer Richard Strauss as well as many artists who in turn looked to Wilde’s interpretation of the Biblical story. We shall be exhibiting four Salomé paintings by the French symbolist painter Pierre-Amédée Marcel-Béronneau, as well as the dramatic Salomé painted during the closing months of the First World War by Cuban born Spanish artist, Federico Beltran Masses.    Elizabeth & Guy Sainty La Biennale Pairs is open from the 10th – 18th of September at the Grand Palais, Paris....

Among the subjects students at the 17th and 18th century French Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture were obliged to study was the human figure, and a mastery of the male nude by both those studying paintings and sculpture was an absolute requirement. The academy school, the École des Beaux Arts (now the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts), was founded as part of the Royal Academy by Louis XIV in 1648 to provide a training for painters, sculptors and architects. Each year prizes were awarded (the Prix de Rome) that entitled the winners to reside for a period of three to five years,at the Rome Academy, now situated in the magnificent Villa Medici,  where they were given expert instruction and exposure to the wonders of antiquity. Following the abolition of the prize by the then minister of Culture in 1968, artists continued to be offered the opportunity to reside at the Academy for up to eighteen months, but without the rigorous course of study prescribed by the directors of the 18th century academy.