Mythological

Delacroix’s Lion Devouring a Goat was owned first by Gustave Arosa and then his brother, Achille, successful business men and financiers in the latter half of the 19th century who each built up notable art collections. Gustave was the guardian of Paul Gauguin and perhaps the lover of his mother; he helped Gauguin financially, while introducing him to a wide social circle.

Masterpiece London 2018, the high point of the London Art Season, opens with week. 

Visit us on stand D7 from Thursday 28th June until Wednesday 4th July (preview 27th June) and see works by artists including, François Boucher, Corrado Giaquinto, Sir William Beechey, Bernard Boutet de Monvel, Federico Beltran Masses, Jacques-Émile Blanche and Pierre-Amédée Marcel-Bérroneau.

Gustave Moreau's students include some notable names, particularly Henri Matisse, Albert Marquet, and Georges Rouault, while Henri Evenepoel, Pierre Amédée Marcel-Béronneau, Georges Désvallières, and Edgar Maxence embraced the symbolism of the 1890s and early 1900s. Moreau’s influence, however, extended beyond his own splendid studio (now the Musée Gustave Moreau, at 14 Rue de la Rochefoucauld in the 9th arrondissement) to a much wider circle. Odilon Redon, who had studied with Jean Léon, was an admireras was the Belgian symbolist, Jean Delville while André Breton, who had visited the Musée Gustave Moreau as a sixteen year old, was overwhelmed by his portrayals of Salomé, Delilah, Sémélé and the Chimera, perceiving Moreau as the precursor of surrealism. Marcel-Béronneau may be considered Moreau’s closest disciple, but he was also influenced by the more powerful eroticism of Franz von Stuck. The paintings illustrated below mark his progression from reinterpreter of Moreau in the 1890s when, at his master’s urging, he submitted works to the 1897 Salon de la Rose+Croix, to his response to von Stuck from the second half of the first decade of the next century into the 1920s.

The world's most prestigious art fair, TEFAF Maastricht, is taking place at the MECC, Maastricht, The Netherlands. The fair is open daily from 11 am and runs until the 19th March. Visit us on stand 348 and see a unique collection of paintings, from the 18th to early 20th centuries, including works by Greuze, Giaquinto, Vigée Le Brun, Rouart, Blanche, List, Marcel-Béronneau and Boutet de Monvel. For more information about TEFAF Maastricht, please contact the gallery.    ...

After a successful fair at La Biennale Paris, we are back at the gallery and our attention now turns to the busy Autumn Art Season here in London.  Come in and visit the gallery over the coming weeks as we exhibit Old Masters and 19th century paintings by Algardi, Goya, Greuze and Blanche to coincide with Frieze Masters art fair in Regent's Park, and early 20th century paintings by Marcel-Béronneau and Boutet de Monvel to compliment PAD London Art + Design, which is just around the corner in Berkeley Square.   For more information, please contact the gallery. ...

Among the subjects students at the 17th and 18th century French Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture were obliged to study was the human figure, and a mastery of the male nude by both those studying paintings and sculpture was an absolute requirement. The academy school, the École des Beaux Arts (now the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts), was founded as part of the Royal Academy by Louis XIV in 1648 to provide a training for painters, sculptors and architects. Each year prizes were awarded (the Prix de Rome) that entitled the winners to reside for a period of three to five years,at the Rome Academy, now situated in the magnificent Villa Medici,  where they were given expert instruction and exposure to the wonders of antiquity. Following the abolition of the prize by the then minister of Culture in 1968, artists continued to be offered the opportunity to reside at the Academy for up to eighteen months, but without the rigorous course of study prescribed by the directors of the 18th century academy.

The scandalous Princess Salomé portrayed as a temptress by Gustave Moreau, Franz von Stuck, Pierre Marcel-Béronneau , Armand Point and Federico Beltran Masses is more a construction of the Western canon than a religious figure. The portrayal of the Jewish princess in the early twentieth century owes more to Oscar Wilde and Richard Strauss than the Gospels. Salomé’s mother Herodias bore a grudge against John the Baptist’s denunciation of Herod as unlawfully married but her name is not mentioned and only appears in later re-tellings. The Gospel of Mark recounts [6:21-29]: