Symbolist

The beginning of December sees a flurry of activity in London's galleries and sale rooms in the form of Old Master Sales Week.  It is an opportunity for the Art World to focus on fine art by established artists from the past whose works have stood the test of time and whose legacies are clear for all to see.  Stair Sainty are delighted to be showing paintings at our gallery, 38 Dover Street, by Old Masters including Boucher, Subleyras, Oudry, Goya and Loir, as well as 19th century artists such as Delacroix, Degas, Manet and Levy-Dhurmer.   Come and visit out gallery weekdays from 10am to 6pm....

Masterpiece London 2018, the high point of the London Art Season, opens with week. 

Visit us on stand D7 from Thursday 28th June until Wednesday 4th July (preview 27th June) and see works by artists including, François Boucher, Corrado Giaquinto, Sir William Beechey, Bernard Boutet de Monvel, Federico Beltran Masses, Jacques-Émile Blanche and Pierre-Amédée Marcel-Bérroneau.

Gustave Moreau's students include some notable names, particularly Henri Matisse, Albert Marquet, and Georges Rouault, while Henri Evenepoel, Pierre Amédée Marcel-Béronneau, Georges Désvallières, and Edgar Maxence embraced the symbolism of the 1890s and early 1900s. Moreau’s influence, however, extended beyond his own splendid studio (now the Musée Gustave Moreau, at 14 Rue de la Rochefoucauld in the 9th arrondissement) to a much wider circle. Odilon Redon, who had studied with Jean Léon, was an admireras was the Belgian symbolist, Jean Delville while André Breton, who had visited the Musée Gustave Moreau as a sixteen year old, was overwhelmed by his portrayals of Salomé, Delilah, Sémélé and the Chimera, perceiving Moreau as the precursor of surrealism. Marcel-Béronneau may be considered Moreau’s closest disciple, but he was also influenced by the more powerful eroticism of Franz von Stuck. The paintings illustrated below mark his progression from reinterpreter of Moreau in the 1890s when, at his master’s urging, he submitted works to the 1897 Salon de la Rose+Croix, to his response to von Stuck from the second half of the first decade of the next century into the 1920s.

An extraordinary and controversial exhibition, Mystical Symbolism, has just opened at the Guggenheim Museum, New York, showing a range of paintings predominately by French artists such as Marcel-Béronneau, Alexandre Séon and Alphonse Osbert, but also Swiss (Ferdinand Hodler) and Belgian (Fernand Khnopff). The exhibition was given a long and erudite review in The New Yorker but with no recent US museum exhibitions dedicated to symbolism, this movement has not been as readily understood in journals whose staff have a narrow perspective of art made before the First World War.

Stair Sainty Gallery is delighted to be exhibiting again at Masterpiece London. This prestigious fair, now in its 8th year, at the Royal Hospital Chelsea promises to be an exciting and vibrant event at the heart of London Art season.  This year Stair Sainty Gallery will be exhibiting paintings by artists including Francisco de Goya, Jean-Baptiste Oudry, Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Henri Rouart, Norbert Goeneutte, Albert Dubois-Pillet, Samuel Frédéric Cordey, Jean-Léon Gérôme, Bernard Boutet de Monvel, Jacques-Émile Blanche, Alexandre Séon, Alphonse Osbert, Pierre Amédée Marcel-Béronneau, Eduard Veith and Jean-Richard Goubie.    Visit us on stand D07 - for more information about Masterpiece, please click here or contact the gallery.    We are also participating in Mayfair Art Weekend so the gallery will be open on Saturday - 10am - 6pm and on Sunday 11am - 5pm. Come and pay us a visit!...

The world's most prestigious art fair, TEFAF Maastricht, is taking place at the MECC, Maastricht, The Netherlands. The fair is open daily from 11 am and runs until the 19th March. Visit us on stand 348 and see a unique collection of paintings, from the 18th to early 20th centuries, including works by Greuze, Giaquinto, Vigée Le Brun, Rouart, Blanche, List, Marcel-Béronneau and Boutet de Monvel. For more information about TEFAF Maastricht, please contact the gallery.    ...

TEFAF Maastricht 2017 opens tomorrow and Stair Sainty is delighted to be returning to stand 348.

This year we are taking around 28 paintings spanning from the mid 18th through to the early 20th centuries. Illustrated - one of the highlights of our stand - a large scale painting by the symbolist artist, Alexandre Séon. Here we see a monumental figure standing in a nocturnal landscape looking towards a lone star in the sky. The white-robed young woman is timeless and the setting could be from anywhere. The stars overhead represent a potent symbol of eternity. 

This week sees the focus of the Art World turn on London's big auction houses for their annual December Old Master sales. Months of work and research culminate in two major evening sales, one at Christie's in St James's and the other at Sotheby's on New Bond Street. These sales are a great opportunity for collectors to see many different artists hung together and to explore the variety and depth of Old Master paintings.  As well as these sales, this week is a perfect time to visit galleries, like Stair Sainty, and view their excellent examples of Old Master paintings. We will be exhibiting an important painting by Francisco de Goya alongside works by Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Alessandro Algardi and Gabriel de Saint-Aubin. As a contrast we will also be featuring 19th and early 20th century paintings by Marcel-Béronneau, Blanche, Vogler, Boutet de Monvel and Beltran Masses.  Visit us at 38 Dover Street, we are open weekdays from 10am to 6pm. ...

The scandalous Princess Salomé portrayed as a temptress by Gustave Moreau, Franz von Stuck, Pierre Marcel-Béronneau , Armand Point and Federico Beltran Masses is more a construction of the Western canon than a religious figure. The portrayal of the Jewish princess in the early twentieth century owes more to Oscar Wilde and Richard Strauss than the Gospels. Salomé’s mother Herodias bore a grudge against John the Baptist’s denunciation of Herod as unlawfully married but her name is not mentioned and only appears in later re-tellings. The Gospel of Mark recounts [6:21-29]: